Law and Order Langham Village History Group
Langham Village History Group
Langham Village History Group
The English Parish Constable of the Middle Ages evolved from the “policing” introduced by the Vikings and Anglo Saxons. The statute of Winchester 1285, governed policing principles until superseded by the Metropolitan Police Act 1829. In the late 16th century, unemployed men often became constables as the wealthier farmers and tradespeople refused to accept this unpaid office. The constable of the 18th century was unpaid and his only mark of authority was his baton. Refusal to accept the position of constable resulted in a fine. Rutland’s Police force came into being in 1849 but grew slowly and the old tradition of parish constables continued. Langham Parish Council elected William Hubbard as constable in 1899 - a position he held until 1916 when he was succeeded by William Edgson. Most of the records of  the Rutland Constabulary were destroyed in 1955 but Langham was apparently served by: PC Watson circa 1908 PC Foyle circa 1913 PC Clark 1920s PC Ted Wright  (later Sergeant)  - Langham’s last village “bobby” During the two world wars special constables were appointed. PC Clark had a waxed moustache and drove a motor cycle with a board in place of a sidecar. A burglary suspect was once transported to Oakham Gaol on this board handcuffed to another officer riding pillion. 26 January 1907 Two men of Langham were caught stealing 1½ pints of milk, by milking cows belonging to Mrs Mantle. They were sentenced to 3 months imprisonment each.
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